Problems

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Found: 2478

Between two mirrors \(AB\) and \(AC\), forming a sharp angle two points \(D\) and \(E\) are located. In what direction should one shine a ray of light from the point \(D\) in such a way that it would reflect off both mirrors and hit the point \(E\)?
If a ray of light comes towards a surface under a certain angle, it is reflected with the same angle as on the picture.

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A circle is inscribed into the triangle \(ABC\) with sides \(BC=6, AC=10\) and \(AB= 12\). A line tangent to the circle intersects two longer sides of the triangle \(AB\) and \(AC\) at the points \(F\) and \(G\) respectively. Find the perimeter of the triangle \(AFG\).

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Liam saw an unusual clock in the museum: the clock had no digits, and it’s not clear how the clock should be rotated. That is, we know that \(1\) is the next digit clockwise from \(12\), \(2\) is the next digit clockwise from \(1\), and so on. Moreover all the arrows (hour, minute, and second) have the same length, so it’s not clear which is which. What time does the clock show?

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Two circles are tangent to each other and the smaller circle with the center \(A\) is located inside the larger circle with the center \(C\). The radii \(CD\) and \(CE\) are tangent to the smaller circle and the angle \(\angle DCE = 60^{\circ}\). Find the ratio of the radii of the circles.

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For positive real numbers \(a,b,c\) prove the inequality: \[(a^2b + b^2c + c^2a)(ab^2 + bc^2 + ca^2)\geq 9a^2b^2c^2.\]

On a \(10\times 10\) board, a bacterium sits in one of the cells. In one move, the bacterium shifts to a cell adjacent to the side (i.e. not diagonal) and divides into two bacteria (both remain in the same new cell). Then, again, one of the bacteria sitting on the board shifts to a new adjacent cell, either horizontally or vertically, and divides into two, and so on. Is it possible for there to be an equal number of bacteria in all cells after several such moves?

Let \(p\) and \(q\) be two prime numbers such that \(q = p + 2\). Prove that \(p^q + q^p\) is divisible by \(p + q\).